Ubuntu consolekit taking up enormous amounts of memory/cpu

I have an older machine that only has a small CPU and a small amount of memory. Ubuntu is designed to run on low resource computers, but It was going into extreme swap situations all the time. I recently go fed up with it, and did two things to help. The first is I changed the swapiness value, which is the tendency of the server to use swap. #edit /etc/sysctl.conf vm.swappiness=0 The second is that I removed consolekit using: apt-get remove...

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Monitoring Resource Usage in Ubuntu with top

When you want to monitor the resources that are being used by your processes, the top command comes in handy. You can see a breakdown of the CPU usage by process, and memory usage as well. There are a few things I use top for regularly. To monitor whether the CPU usage is too high. To monitor whether Memory usage is too high.  — This can be misleading sometimes because of cache issues. To monitor whether the machine has entered into SWAP...

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Directory Sorting and File Size’s in Ubuntu

If you’ve ever had a harddrive randomly fill up on you, you’ll know the importance of a recursive call to iterate through your directories looking for big files. Ubuntu has a fairly easy way to do this. du -k | sort -nr | more The above code will recursively iterate through the directory you are in and all directories in it, and find the largest directories and files. It will sort them largest to smallest. So if your /var/log folder...

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Realtime Bandwidth monitoring tools on Ubuntu

Speed tests are nice for a simple look at whether or not you’re getting the speed you pay for from your ISP. However, if you want a detailed look at what’s going in and our of your system, you need to be monitoring the actual ethernet adapter. Ubuntu lets you do that with a couple of different commands. sudo iftop sudo bmon I prefer iftop. You have to install it though as it is not a core system functionality. sudo apt-get install...

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How to monitor Disk I/O on Ubuntu

If you want to see if your hard disks are saturated with reading and writing, there is a built in command to Ubuntu to do so. If you can’t hear the plates spinning away while sitting right next to your computer, just use the command that followings and you’ll see the current write speed and read speed. Check the man page for more options....

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How to MD5 checksum a file on Ubuntu

How to MD5 checksum a file on Ubuntu

If you need to compare a file to make sure it’s the same file, or contains the same contents, then MD5 checksums are a good way to go. If you use MD5 before you copy a file and after you copy a file, you can ensure that the contents of the file were not changed during the copy. You can also save checksums of files so that in a few months/years, you can ensure that the file was not currupted or changed over time. To get the MD5 checksum...

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